Mar-a-Lago property manager faces first court appearance in Trump classified documents case

Carlos De Oliveira, the second Mar-a-Lago employee to be charged in the U.S. government’s classified documents case against former President Donald Trump, is scheduled to make his first court appearance in Miami on Monday.

Last Thursday, De Oliveira, 56, was charged in a superseding indictment handed up by a Miami grand jury, which also brought new charges against Trump and his personal aide, Waltine Nauta, 40.  All three are accused, among other things, of attempting to delete security footage at Mar-a-Lago the Justice Department sought as part of its investigation.

Both Trump and Nauta have pleaded not guilty at prior arraignments in Miami. Neither man was expected to appear Monday before Chief U.S. Magistrate Edwin Torres Jr., who is overseeing De Oliveira’s first court appearance.

But all three are accused in the revised indictment of attempting “to delete surveillance footage showing movement of Trump’s boxes at The Mar-a-Lago Club;” according to a government filing.

Another part of the superseding indictment  “alleges Nauta’s and Trump’s efforts on August 26, 2022, to confirm and maintain De Oliveira’s loyalty,” according to a government notice to the court of the new indictment’s filing.

De Oliveira became property manager of the Mar-a-Lago estate in January 2022 after more than 10 years’ employment. According to the Washington Post, De Oliveira and a defense lawyer met with federal authorities in April to review his conduct at Mar-a-Lago amid prosecutors’ suspicions about his actions during the documents probe.

Instead of reassuring the prosecutors, De Oliveira ended up being added to the case as its third defendant. According to the revised indictment, he is accused of a conspiracy to obstruct justice, “altering, destroying, mutilating of concealing an object,” “corruptly altering, destroying, mutilating or concealing a document, record or other object,” and making “false statements and representations.’

It is unclear who would represent De Oliveira in Miami on Monday. As of Sunday evening, the court docket had not listed any attorney appearing on De Oliveira’s behalf. Published reports have referred to a lawyer by the name of John Irving; but no one by that name is listed by the Florida Bar as a member.

Previously, Nauta’s not guilty plea was delayed because he lacked a lawyer authorized to practice in the federal Southern District of Florida.

Waltine Nauta, left, a valet to former President Donald Trump who is charged with helping the ex-president hide classified documents, enters a downtown Miami federal courthouse with attorney Stanley Woodward Jr. for his arraignment in early July. Fellow Mar-a-Lago employee and new co-defendant Carlos De Oliveira was due Monday to appear in the same courthouse. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Waltine Nauta, left, a valet to former President Donald Trump who is charged with helping the ex-president hide classified documents, enters a downtown Miami federal courthouse with attorney Stanley Woodward Jr. for his arraignment in early July. Fellow Mar-a-Lago employee and new co-defendant Carlos De Oliveira is due Monday to appear in the same courthouse. (Rebecca Blackwell/AP file)

Save America, a Trump political action committee, is reported to have spent more than $40 million for legal fees for the former president and various employees and others over the first six months of this year, according to multiple media reports citing a PAC filing expected to be filed with the Federal Election Commission on Monday.

In a written pitch now on the Save America website, Trump asks for additional contributions by Monday.

“The Left thinks that if they bury me with enough witch hunts and intimidate my family and associates that I’ll eventually throw up my hands and give up on our America First movement,” he wrote. “Let me be as clear as possible: I WILL NEVER STOP FIGHTING FOR YOU.”

Legal fees for lawyers representing De Oliveira and Nauta are being covered by Trump’s political operation, according to published reports.

Feds: No schedule changes expected

Prosecutors working for Special Counsel Jack Smith have advised U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon, who is presiding over the case in Fort Pierce, that the new charges against Trump “should not disturb” her May 24, 2024, trial date or a lengthy schedule of motion deadlines and hearing dates she set for between now and the first half of next year.

“The Special Counsel’s Office is taking steps related to discovery and security clearances to ensure that it does not do so,” the prosecutors wrote in their indictment notice.

The government lawyers said they “will promptly produce discovery related to the new obstruction defendant, allegations, and counts.”

“Second, with respect to De Oliveira, the Special Counsel’s Office will provide counsel a copy of the protective order for unclassified discovery … and once counsel has entered an appearance in the case, will arrange to produce all unclassified discovery that has been provided to the other defendants,” the prosecutors said.

The prosecution team also said they “will immediately connect De Oliveira’s counsel with the Litigation Security Group to begin arrangements for clearing De Oliveira’s counsel to review classified discovery.”

At a hearing before Cannon last month, lawyers for Trump and Nauta indicated that anything short of a post-2024 election trial date would be unfair to the defendants because there was insufficient time to prepare for the case as he is running for a new term as President and is confronted by other legal matters elsewhere.

This is a developing story, so check back for updates. Click here to have breaking news alerts sent directly to your inbox.

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