Christian

Apostate Pastor’s Pro-Homosexual Sermon Earns Him Special Trip to White House

By Garrett Haley LA MIRADA, Calif. – An apostate former Southern Baptist pastor, who endorsed homosexuality in a recent sermon, has been invited to attend a ‘gay pride’ reception at the White House with President Obama. As previously reported, Danny Cortez leads New Heart Community Church in southern California. Earlier this year, Cortez surprised his Baptist congregation by declaring that he has accepted a pro-homosexual position. “This is a huge step for a Southern Baptist church!!” Cortez ecstatically wrote in a letter to a Patheos blogger. “So now, we will accept the LGBT community even though they may be in a relationship. We will choose to remain the body of Christ and not cast judgment.” In his letter, Cortez further explained that his 15-year-old son came out as “gay” soon after he changed his mind on the homosexuality issue. Following Cortez’s homosexuality-affirming sermon on February 9, the leaders of New Heart Community Church decided to not dismiss him from the preaching position, instead voting to part ways from the Southern Baptist Convention and become a “third way” congregation. Now, according to reports, Cortez and his son have been invited to attend a reception at the White House as a result of their pro-homosexual position. An online …read more Source: Christian News Network     ...
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Education

Recent Shooting in California Gives Glimpse Into Example of Societal Issues

By jdonzelli FORT LAUDERDALE-DAVIE, Fla. – It’s easy to look at the recent tragic shooting at Isla Vista California as just another isolated incident of violence. But there’s something that separates this incident from the others: the suspect clearly exhibited something that is all too often prevalent in society – “male privilege.” Male privilege means a man believes he’s entitled to something simply because he’s a man. In this case, it seems the suspect believed women were his birthright. Having experienced this first-hand, I can tell you it is real. It can be subtle, or it can be brash and violent. I’ve experienced both. When I was 22 I was a first year English teacher seeking guidance from a colleague. He “playfully” stuffed a tissue down my top. Only months later could I allow myself to call it harassment. A year later I was a Peace Corps Volunteer on a bus ride out to a school in Masembura, Zimbabwe. A local man begins flirting with me. I ignore him. He stood up, shouting, then proposing marriage, then shouting again. He began to explain the specific nature of the beating and raping he would inflict on me if I didn’t respond. …read more Source: NSU News     ...
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Education

Child Welfare & Protection Concerns Every Citizen

By jdonzelli FORT LAUDERDALE-DAVIE, Fla. – Those who work in the field of child protection and welfare see traumatized children and their families every day. For those committed to caring for children involved in the dependency system, the safety of that child is critical. Over the last year the number of children entering the child welfare system has increased. We all know that something has to change. During Florida’s 2014 Legislative Session, Governor Rick Scott has been joined by many Legislators in bringing a renewed focus to the issue of child welfare and protection. While our lawmakers discuss how best to revamp and improve the current system, those of us who work in the field applaud their efforts and are happy to see this issue moving to the forefront. There’s no denying that removing a child from a detrimental situation is important, but it’s only the first step in getting them the help they need. That’s why we feel an overhaul must include all the professionals in the human service field – social workers, psychologists, marriage and family therapists, mental health coun selors, and child protection master’s degree. We must provide more appropriately trained individuals who then work with the child once he/she is removed …read more Source: NSU News     ...
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Education

Autism Affects Millions Across the Globe

By jdonzelli FORT LAUDERDALE-DAVIE, Fla. – You’ve probably seen the statistics: one in 88 children – and one in 54 boys – born in the United States will be diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). For years, many people didn’t understand what autism was all about. Thankfully, through the efforts of so many including Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale and organizations like the Autism Society and Autism Speaks, as well as several high profile celebrities who have someone in their family with an autism diagnosis – from Dan Marino to Ernie Els to Sylvester Stallone to Holly Robinson-Peete – that has begun to change. April is National Autism Awareness Month with a special emphasis on April 2, World Autism Awareness Day. To help bring attention to autism a wareness, students, faculty and staff at NSU will be joining others around the world by wearing blue on April 2 (blue is the official color of autism awareness.) NSU’s reputation for innovative, hands-on, active learning is evidenced through the educational programs provided at its Mailman Segal Center for Human Development (MSC.) For more than 30 years, MSC has been at the forefront providing excellence in early childhood education as well as clinical services for children with …read more Source: NSU News     ...
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Local News

Congressional Homelessness Caucus hosts briefing on violence against the homeless

By Carma Henry Congressman Alcee L.Hastings Congressional Homelessness Caucus hosts briefing on violence against the homeless WASHINGTON, D.C. — Today, the Co-Chairs of the Congressional Homeless Caucus, Reps. Alcee L. Hastings (D-FL) and Eddie Bernice Johnson, in conjunction with the office of Congressman John Conyers (D-MI), hosted an important briefing on violence against the homeless. “Thankfully, we have seen a decrease in the number of homeless Americans in recent years,” said Hastings. “However, those facing homelessness still face real threats from violence. My home state of Florida has long been at the top of the list of states where violence against the homeless remains a significant problem, and that needs to change. As a nation, we must do more to protect the homeless population and to foster an environment where the most disadvantaged amongst us can break the cycle of homelessness.”” Violence against homeless individuals is a problem that has no boundaries. It is a threat to our homeless men, women, and children of all backgrounds,” said Johnson. “Until we have a sound understanding of the scope and nature of the problem, we will remain unable to develop targeted solutions or draft comprehensive reform. Today’s briefing is …read more Source: The Westside Gazette     ...
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Local News

10 Worst States in America for Black children

By Carma Henry 10 Worst States in America for Black children By Smriti Sinha Black families pondering a move to the Midwest might want to read this, especially if they have young children. According to a national report, Wisconsin has been ranked the worst state in the country when it comes to racial disparities for children. The Annie E. Casey Foundation, a 66-year-old charitable organization concentrating on family issues and well-being, spearheaded the study. “Race for Results: Building a Path to Opportunity for All Children” scored states according to 12 different factors, from educational access to socioeconomic status and home life. Wisconsin scored a 238 on its ability to prepare Black children for educational and financial success, the lowest of all states (the average score was 345). Interestingly, Wisconsin was ranked 10th overall in its preparation for white children. Ten Worst States in America for Black Children 1) Wisconsin 2) Mississippi 3) Michigan 4) Louisiana 5) Arkansas 6) Ohio 7) Alabama 8) Indiana 9) South Carolina 10) Illinois …read more Source: The Westside Gazette     ...
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Local News

Dear Friends,

By Carma Henry Dear Friends, Upsets don’t just happen. If you look at House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s recent primary loss upset, there were a lot of factors that came together, ranging from Cantor’s detachment and focus on Washington politics to the Tea Party’s use of Cantor’s prominence as a symbol for the very thing they were asking voters to reject. In 2012, the same thing happened to former Congressman Allen West. Then candidate Patrick Murphy, despite being outspent four-to-one, masterfully defeated West by running a perfect campaign that contrasted his balanced views and down-to-earth demeanor against West’s outrageous bomb-throwing rhetoric. Both of these incumbents lost because they didn’t truly know their district, spend time with the people they were supposed to be representing, and were too focused on themselves and not the issues that mattered to their constituents. I am focused on serving my community and making sure that they and all Americans have the opportunities necessary to succeed and provide for their families. My office isn’t rooted in DC; it’s rooted in the Florida communities I have been privileged to serve over the years. I know so many of you because we’ve met, not in DC, but in the churches, synagogues, local businesses, …read more Source: The Westside Gazette     ...
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Local News

Freedom Summer – 50 years later

By Carma Henry George E. Curry Freedom Summer – 50 years later By George E. Curry NNPA Columnist The 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer is being commemorated this week in Mississippi and it provides the perfect backdrop to reflect on the transformation of not only Mississippi, then the deadliest state in the nation, but the entire region. As I have written in the space before, there was a popular joke about Mississippi making the rounds during the height of the Civil Rights Movement. Supposedly, a Chicago seminary student who was awakened at 3 a.m. by a voice imploring him: “Go to Mississippi! Go to Mississippi!! Go to Mississippi!!!” The seminary student said, “Lord, you said that you will be with me always, even until the end of the earth. If I go to Mississippi, will you go with me?” The heavenly voice replied, “I’ll go as far as Memphis.” Of course, if the Lord was reluctant to go to Mississippi, the chances of a Black surviving were slim and none. At the time, I had just completed my junior year at Druid High School in Tuscaloosa, Ala. In the summer of 1964, Alabama had its own violent racial history when it came to race relations, but Mississippi was …read more Source: The Westside Gazette     ...
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Local News

Fifty years after Civil Rights Act: A land of opportunity

By Carma Henry Fifty years after Civil Rights Act: A land of opportunity By William Spriggs (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Fifty years ago, the U.S. Senate passed the version of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that would be passed by the House and signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson. The bill faced a filibuster of 14 hours and 13 minutes by the late Sen. Robert Byrd of West Virginia. Between the passage by the Senate and debate by the House, three young civil rights workers-Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Earl Chaney-disappeared into the night on June 21, 1964, driving in the rural area near Philadelphia, Miss. Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney were later found dead, having been murdered for trying to register African American voters in Mississippi. On Monday, this week, the AFL-CIO supported a Moral Monday protest in North Carolina revisiting many of the issues America faced in 1964, and meant to be addressed by the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Many things have changed since then. Too many things have not. The Senate debated the Civil Rights Act for 60 working days, including Saturday sessions. Rarely today does Congress meet to carefully craft legislation lifting the lives of people. An important purpose of the act …read more Source: The Westside Gazette     ...
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Local News

You have to lead by example

By Carma Henry You have to lead by example By Natasha Dowdy Gordon It is almost impossible to believe that the world has lost the legendary poet and activist Maya Angelou, and the actress and activist Ruby Dee within weeks of each other. Both women were inspiring, soul stirring, motivational figures who demanded the respect that they deserved and got it, not by being overbearing and pushy, but by being dignified ladies who knew the proper way to balance their inner and outward beauty, their undeniable sex appeal, their intelligence, and their extraordinary talents. Ruby Dee and her actor/activist husband Ozzie Davis were perhaps the first of what is now called the Hollywood power couple. Together they took the phrase, “To whom much is given, much is to be expected”, as a lifelong mantra. Ruby Dee and Ozzie could have just enjoyed the perks of being the be-loved entertainers that they were, but community outreach, civil and human rights, and equality for every man, woman, and child, was what Ruby Dee and Ozzie spent their lives fighting for. In the world of labor, Ruby Dee and Ozzie worked endlessly fighting for the rights of working people everywhere. Together with leaders like Martian Luther King, Jr., Rev. Joseph …read more Source: The Westside Gazette     ...
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Local News

Blacks have not recovered from the recovery

By Carma Henry Blacks have not recovered from the recovery By Julianne Malveaux NNPA Columnist Judging from its June 18-19 meeting, the Federal Reserve is hedging its bets. It says the U.S. economy is on the mend, but more slowly than expected. They’ve reduced their estimate for economic growth and say that it will take a year or more to get to where we were six years ago. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has offered a starker forecast. Expected growth for the United States is about 3 percent, a level considered “normal” and “in recovery.” They projected something right above 2 percent earlier this year. Now, they say the United States economy will grow at about 1.9 percent, below robust recovery, and that it will take until 2018 to get the labor market back on track. Meanwhile, the stock market seems to signal a healthy recovery, and surveys of human resource professionals found that more employers are offering signing and retention bonuses to get the best employees and to keep them. Obviously, the nearly 10 million people who are unemployed aren’t being offered any kind of bonuses. Most of them just want work. That’s not to mention the 3.4 million people who have not worked …read more Source: The Westside Gazette     ...
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Local News

Blacks need more racists

By Carma Henry Raynard Jackson Blacks need more racists By Raynard Jackson NNPA Columnist A few weeks ago, the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) made a stunning announcement that caused a lot of consternation in the Black community. UNCF had accepted a $25 million contribution from Koch Industries and the Charles Koch Foundation. Under normal circumstances, David and Charles Koch – the brothers who control the two entities – would be applauded for their generosity. But some Blacks have labeled the Koch brothers as racist simply because they are white, conservative, and libertarians who believe in smaller government, lower taxes and ballot integrity. However, when the critics are asked to specify what has the Koch family done that is racist, they draw blanks. They equate philosophical disagreements with being a racist. Even if that were the case, why reject money that will actually benefit Black students? The gift is one of largest in the history of UNCF. The UNCF is the primary fund-raising organization for students at private, historically Black colleges. UNCF President Michael Lomax had no problem accepting the check, saying, “… We believe that our cause is a cause that all Americans can and should support regardless of their views on other matters.” The money will …read more Source: The Westside Gazette     ...
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