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Noteworthy Deaths of 2015: Elisabeth Elliot, Robert Schuller, Andrae Crouch, and More

By Morgan Lee Here are the Christian leaders lost last year that CT readers mourned most. Here are the 20 obituaries and tributes that CT readers circulated most in 2015, presented in chronological order. Gospel Music Legend Andrae Crouch He combined Saturday night with Sunday morning. Marcus Borg, Liberal Jesus Scholar and Friendly Provocateur Borg was a prominent leader of the Jesus Seminar, an effort to separate what Jesus scholars saw as fact from myth in the Gospels. Steve Hayner, Former President of InterVarsity and Columbia Seminary He was known for his presidency at InterVarsity Christian Fellowship and later at Columbia Theological Seminary. Samuel Hugh Moffett, a Leading Expert in East Asia Christianity Global Christian mission should pivot to Asia’s 4.4 billion people, Moffett said. Leanne Payne, Prominent Leader in Pastoral Care and Healing Movement Author of seven books, she supported orientation change for gays and lesbians. Lyle Schaller, Preeminent Church Consultant No one may have advised more churches in the 20th century. Kara Tippetts, Christian Mom and Blogger Tippetts mustered a vulnerability and beauty in the deep, kind love she lavished on friends and family through her last days, a capacity deepened …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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News: What Arab Christians Think of Wheaton-Hawkins 'Same God' Debate

By Jayson Casper in Cairo Controversy echoes what Christians in Middle East have dealt with for centuries. Larycia Hawkins has a fan in Egypt. Theresa, the nine-months-pregnant wife of a Coptic Orthodox juice stand owner, could not hide her admiration when told how a Christian professor donned a hijab in solidarity with Muslims facing prejudice in America. “It is a beautiful thing she has done, going beyond the norm to better approach others,” she said. “But it would not work here.” Her comment came on the heels of her husband Hani’s discomfort. He called the symbolic act “extreme.” In doing so, the humble man mixing mango and strawberry mirrored the reactions of most regional theologians. All commended Hawkins’s intentions, but only one—the Palestinian head of a seminary—praised it as a stand for justice. One pastor called it “excessive.” A bishop, “unnecessary.” An Egyptian former seminary vice president even raised the idea of “second-class citizen.” And therein lies the rub. Whether considering donning the hijab in solidarity or debating if Muslims and Christians worship the same God, Arab Christians operate in a vastly different religious context. Only recently have American Christians had to deal with issues raised by Muslims in their midst. The 9/11 tragedy birthed a political culture that seeks unity through theological …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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More Women Sue Bill Gothard and IBLP, Alleging Sexual Abuse

By Sarah Eekhoff Zylstra Amended lawsuit increases severity of allegations. IBLP welcomes the court process. Five more women have added their complaints to a lawsuit accusing Institute in Basic Life Principles (IBLP) founder Bill Gothard, now 81, of sexual abuse and harassment. They join five women who filed suit in October against IBLP, saying the institute ignored and mismanaged their complaints of Gothard’s and other staff’s behavior. IBLP asked the court to dismiss the lawsuit for lack of supporting facts. Attorneys for the women asked for permission to refile the suit. They did, this time with twice as many plaintiffs, including one who brings the first accusation of rape against Gothard. His name was also added as a defendant, according to legal documents reviewed by CT. Lawsuits only tell one side of a story, and Gothard denied the charges. “Oh no. Never never. Oh! That’s horrible,” he told TheWashington Post, which broke the story. “Never in my life have I touched a girl sexually. I’m shocked to even hear that.” In a “further confession and request” attached to the amended lawsuit, Gothard states he “was very wrong in holding hands, giving hugs, and touching hair and feet” of the “young ladies” whom he selected as his …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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Modes of Mission: A Missional Posture

By Ed Stetzer This week, in our series examining mission modes, we look at how John lived on mission. One of the active characteristics of God’s mission is the notion of “sentness.” God establishes this pattern early in redemptive history. He goes to Adam and Eve, but sends Abraham to the Promised Land, Moses to Egypt, Jonah to the Ninevites, Jesus to the world, the Spirit to the Church, and the Church to the nations. Clearly, God’s mission involves sending. In the New Testament, John stresses the “sent” theme more than any other. Other than describing the sentness of Jesus and the disciples, John also references John the Baptist being sent (John 1:6–7, 15; 3:28, 34) and the Holy Spirit being sent (John 14:26; John 16:7–8). Thus, the Johannine mode of mission establishes sentness as a missional impulse. The missional impulse of sentness is found in John 20:21, where John records Jesus saying, “Peace to you! As the Father has sent Me, I also send you.” It may seem on the surface that sentness means going. While sentness certainly implies going, the Johannine mode of mission stresses something far deeper and richer given that it connects the sentness of the disciples to that of the …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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God Made All of Me: An Interview With Justin and Lindsey Holcomb

By Ed Stetzer I recently talked to Justin and Lindsey Holcomb about their new book which attempts to protect children. Q: Why did you write God Made All of Me? For what age range is it written? The book is for 2-8 year olds. We wrote it because we have two young children and know that parents need tools to help talk with their kids about their bodies and to help them understand the difference between appropriate and inappropriate touch. It allows families to build a first line of defense against sexual abuse in the safety of their own homes. Our goal is to help parents and caregivers in protecting their children from sexual abuse. Because private parts are private, there can be lots of questions, curiosity, or shame regarding them. For their protection, children need to know about private parts and understand that God made their body and made it special. Q: What do the statistics about child sexual abuse tell parents about the importance of talking about this topic with their kids? Child sexual abuse is more prevalent than most people think and the offenders are usually people parents and the children know, not strangers. Approximately 1 in 5 children will be sexually abused by their …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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Christian Declaration on Caring for Refugees: An Evangelical Response

By Ed Stetzer How can Christians respond to this crisis. On December 17th, a number of evangelical leaders gathered together to meet about how the Church in America might engage the refugee crisis in a Christlike way. At our meeting, we drafted and signed the following statement: Impacting nearly 60 million people, the global refugee emergency is a humanitarian crisis of unprecedented size. Never have so many people been recorded as being displaced, put in danger, and sent on the move. In Syria alone, more than 13 million children and their parents need humanitarian aid. Nearly 4.4 million have been forced to flee to neighboring countries for safety. Moments like these are when Christians cannot remain silent and still. In light of this crisis, we commit ourselves and our churches to actively care for and minister to global refugees with mercy and compassion, both here and abroad, based on God’s compelling concern for all people in need and especially refugees. In light of these concerns, we affirm the following: Refugees possess the image of God and, as such, are infinitely valuable to God and to us. We are commanded to love our neighbor, and it is our privilege to love refugees. As Christians, we must care sacrificially …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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#HellenistWidowsMatter: A Parable

By Ed Stetzer What might we learn from the Scriptures about advocating for those who feel wronged? The Hellenist widows were upset. They were being overlooked—treated unjustly. They did not believe they were valued like the Hebraic widows. It was hard to avoid the racial and ethnic issues of the conflict. The Hebraic widows, who were more ethnically aligned with the majority of the church leaders, were just fine. They did not see the issue. Why were these Hellenists so upset? What’s the big deal anyway? A widow is a widow, right? But, the Hellenist widows WERE being overlooked; they were being treated differently, and valued differently—because of their ethnicity. So, they spoke up. When their experience confirmed to them a pattern of discrimination, they started a hashtag, #HellenistWidowsMatter to explain that they, too, were important. They mattered. Their needs and lives were important. That made some people uncomfortable. Some dismissed the Hellenist widows as attention seekers. They started a competing hashtag, #AllWidowsMatter, because, they explained, no one was better than anyone else. The people who started #AllWidowsMatter meant well—they wanted to affirm the value of all widows. Since “all” included the Hellenistic widows they couldn’t see a reason their hashtag was in any way a bad thing—all widows matter. But, all widows were …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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Meet the Dutch Christians Who Saved Their Jewish Neighbors from the Nazis

By Suzanne Burden Diet Eman endured Hitler’s occupation separated from her fiance, Hein Sietsma. But apart, they served in the Dutch Underground—saving at least 60 Jews from certain death. Pop-pop-pop! Diet Eman lay awake in her bed. Who could be beating their rugs at this hour? It was early morning on May 10, 1940. Hours before, Hitler had announced that he would respect the neutrality that the Netherlands had maintained during World War I. As the popping continued, Eman and her parents scrambled to the front lawn. Planes buzzed through the night sky and fire shot upward, shattering Hitler’s assurances. Stumbling back inside, the Emans turned the radio on: “We are at war. German paratroopers have landed.” Diet’s blood boiled; Hitler had lied. Then a new question rattled around in her mind as she sat in her nightclothes: What of my Hein? A few days later, she found out. A card from Hein Sietsma, smudged by fire, arrived at the house, saying he had survived fiery blasts in Rotterdam, South Holland. She also discovered something else. As Eman later said, “I did not know until the danger of war that I was in love with him.” She also did not know how war would shape their relationship, how many …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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Join Us at the 2016 GC2 Summit on the Church and Refugees

By Ed Stetzer Learn how the Church can serve refugees at Wheaton College in Wheaton, IL on January 20th for just $15. The refugee crisis has been exploding for quite some time and over the last few weeks and months it has captured attention across the country. While the crisis has been happening for a while, some are just now beginning to process the devastation. Over 200,000 Syrians have died in their 4.5 year conflict. That is roughly the equivalent of the Paris death toll every day since the start of their struggle. Approximately 25% of those killed have been women and children, and over 80,000 of those killed have been civilians. This has led to a mass exodus where over half the population of Syria, 12 million people, have now had to flee their home looking for safety. It’s not just a Syrian refugee crisis, but that’s become the news. That impacts the Middle East, and much of our efforts should be there—working for peace, serving the hurting, and helping people settle there. The vast majority of work is in the Middle East, but also conversations about refugees are also at work in the West. We believe that Christians need to respond …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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Incubation: Multiplication by Addition (Part 1)

By Ed Stetzer Ray Chang stops by to share about how churches may come alongside church planters to support them in their work. Several months ago, we launched our first church planter cohort. Seven church planters sat around tables, each one sharing his vision for launching a new church. As each planter shared his background and story, I began to hear a common theme around these church planters. Out of the seven, five had already planted a church, but the church was unable to sustain and flourish. Each story was filled with pain, frustration and helplessness. One planter was given orders from his senior pastor to plant a church in two weeks. He could ask anyone in the two week time frame and was given a two months salary to launch a church. Another planter left a large mega-church where he served on staff as the youth and college ministry pastor. After expressing his desire to plant a church, the senior pastor let him go without support or help. The next planter shared the story of starting off at a local college campus, where they started reaching the campus, but they soon realized that without a financial base of families, the church began to …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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How ‘The Ninth Configuration’ Argues For God’s Goodness

By Nick Ripatrazone The unofficial 1980 sequel to ‘The Exorcist’ offers an answer to its predecessor’s view of evil. Early in The Exorcist, actress Chris MacNeil (Ellen Burstyn) has a cocktail party in her home in Washington, D.C. Among the guests is Father Joseph Dyer (William O’Malley), a charismatic priest from nearby Georgetown University. There’s also an unnamed astronaut about to leave on a mission. Chris’s young daughter Regan (Linda Blair) is sick and resting upstairs. Father Dyer holds court at a piano, leading the guests in song. He proclaims that “my idea of heaven is a solid white nightclub with me as the headliner for all eternity, and they love me.” Dyer’s performance is interrupted by Regan, who has snuck downstairs. She tells the astronaut, “You’re gonna die up there” and then urinates on the carpet. Chris rushes Regan back upstairs. The party ends, but the film’s drama begins. As soon as Chris leaves the room, Regan’s bed shakes violently, leading to the horrific possession that follows. By the time Father Damien Karras (Jason Miller) is joined by Father Lancaster Merrin (Max von Sydow) to exorcise Regan, the astronaut has faded from the audience’s memory. Yet screenwriter William Peter Blatty had plans for the astronaut. Forget …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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How Patriotic Church Services Misunderstand the Military

By Todd Lovell They sing anthems that reverence God and country, but speak little of the lived experiences of veterans. This June, CT drew attention to veterans’ experiences in the cover story “Formed by War.” To continue the discourse sparked by that story, alongside the Centurions Guild, CT is hosting an online series called Ponder Christian Soldiers. (Read the introduction to the series here, and the following installments on how a PTSD diagnosis can help and harm, the soldiers of church history, what Jesus said to a chaplain after a suicide bombing, why soldiers crave the extremes of active duty, why we need a better framework for ministering to military members, and why one member of the military is not a conscientious objector.) In what seemed like a fever dream, I found myself peddling hot dogs at a local rodeo one hot September night. I guess that’s what you get when you work as a pastoral intern for a rural congregation in eastern North Carolina. Townsfolk crowded into the bleachers as cowboys and cowgirls tested their strength and dexterity against mighty beasts of burden. After hours of competition, the lights suddenly lowered, and a …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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Christian TV Helps ISIS Surivivors

By Jayson Casper in Cairo With the help of Myriam, the girl who forgave ISIS, Arabic broadcaster finds ‘unconventional’ way to bring education into refugee camps. Last spring, a 10-year-old Christian girl famously forgave ISIS for driving her family from their home in Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city. Myriam’s video interview with Christian broadcaster SAT-7 went viral, witnessed by more than 3 million people on television and social media. When Myriam fled from ISIS, so did her friend Sandra. Sandra’s family first took refuge in Lebanon, while Myriam’s family headed for Erbil, the capital of the Kurdish region of Iraq. Eventually, both families settled into a refugee camp at Mar Elias Catholic Church in Erbil. Myriam previously told SAT-7 she had three wishes. The first: For her message of forgiveness to reach the world. Now her second and third wishes have also been fulfilled. She has returned to school, and Sandra has joined her. She now shares a desk with her childhood friend. “I can’t describe the joy that I felt,” Myriam told SAT-7. But the joy of school is unknown to most of the approximately 3.5 million internally displaced children of Syria and Iraq. World Vision estimates that 2.5 million Syrian children—including both the internally …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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All the Justice Money Can Buy

By Mary DeMuth, guest writer From the ‘affluenza’ teen to Steven Avery, there’s a reason we care so much about a fair trail. Shauna Jennings will never forget June 16, 2013. It was supposed to be a happy celebration, the day of her son’s graduation party. But when they came upon an accident on their way, her husband—a pastor and a good man to the core—stopped to help a stranded driver and got struck by a speeding truck. He died at the scene, the sudden, tragic end to their 20-year marriage. Jennings was not alone in her grief; in all, four pedestrians were killed, and two others severely injured. The person responsible—though “irresponsible” seems to be a more apt term in the case—is now a name we know from headlines: Ethan Couch. At 16, he’d been driving his daddy’s pickup at 70 miles per hour, his blood alcohol at three times the legal limit thanks to two cases of beer shoplifted from a local Wal Mart. He also tests positive for Valium. From time to time, we read about such accidents in the news and lament how one person’s bad decisions and foolish actions gravely impact families and communities. The small solace for victims is the hope …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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Christian TV Helps ISIS Survivors

By Jayson Casper in Cairo With the help of Myriam, the girl who forgave ISIS, Arabic broadcaster finds ‘unconventional’ way to bring education into refugee camps. Last spring, a 10-year-old Christian girl famously forgave ISIS for driving her family from their home in Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city. Myriam’s video interview with Christian broadcaster SAT-7 went viral, witnessed by more than 3 million people on television and social media. When Myriam fled from ISIS, so did her friend Sandra. Sandra’s family first took refuge in Lebanon, while Myriam’s family headed for Erbil, the capital of the Kurdish region of Iraq. Eventually, both families settled into a refugee camp at Mar Elias Catholic Church in Erbil. Myriam previously told SAT-7 she had three wishes. The first: For her message of forgiveness to reach the world. Now her second and third wishes have also been fulfilled. She has returned to school, and Sandra has joined her. She now shares a desk with her childhood friend. “I can’t describe the joy that I felt,” Myriam told SAT-7. But the joy of school is unknown to most of the approximately 3.5 million internally displaced children of Syria and Iraq. World Vision estimates that 2.5 million Syrian children—including both the internally …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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C. S. Lewis Was No Sexist

By Gina Dalfonzo Two recent titles explore the great apologist’s relationships with women. During his lifetime, C. S. Lewis was a widely read and respected Christian writer, even though he called himself a “dinosaur” who was out of step with the times. In the decades since his death, his reputation as one of the greatest 20th-century Christian thinkers—or perhaps the greatest—has increased, as more generations come to know and love his works. But was Lewis truly a writer for all people—or was he inherently, irrevocably biased toward his own gender? This question, in some form or other, has dogged the author for decades. Detractors use various passages—Susan turning away from Narnia in The Last Battle for the sake of typically feminine preoccupations; Jane Studdock’s power struggles with her husband, and the way they’re eventually resolved, in That Hideous Strength; and Lewis’s praises of male friendship—to paint him as an incurable sexist. Popular young adult fantasy author Philip Pullman has called him “monumentally disparaging of women,” while literary critic John Goldthwaite accused him of fearing and disliking them. The many contributors to Women and C. S. Lewis: What His Life and Literature Reveal for Today’s Culture beg to differ. Edited by Carolyn Curtis and Mary Pomroy …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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The Importance of Gospel-Centered Teaching in Children's Ministry

By Ed Stetzer Children’s ministry leaders weigh in on why it is important that they teach children in a gospel-centered way. Ed Stetzer:Why is a gospel-centered, more theological curriculum higher on the shelf for you? Lou Cha (Kenwood Baptist Church, Cincinnati, OH): Christianity is all about Christ. The Old Testament points to Christ. The New Testament is a revelation of Christ. So if Christ is not at the center of what we’re teaching and Christ is not the person that we’re drawing kids to, then we’ve totally missed the point of what it means to be a Christian and to be the body of Christ. So the gospel has to be center and we just need to be more intentional about that in making Christ the center of our life, our teaching, and the life of our homes and our church. Karen Dolan (Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York City, NY): I would say that I am of the opinion that if we are not teaching a Christ-centered, theologically sound curriculum for our kids, we’re doing them a disservice. If we’re watering down what the gospel is and what it means to know Christ and to be a follower of Him, we’re not teaching these kids enough. And then, that’s not …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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7 Anticipated Books of 2016

CT asked publishers which theology and biblical studies books they were most excited to publish this year. Here are the entries. Modern Christian Theology Christopher Ben Simpson (T&T Clark, February) By putting the story of modern Christian theology against the backdrop of the history of modernity itself, Simpson examines the ways in which theology became modern, while showing how theology contributed to the rise of modernity. None Like Him: 10 Ways God Is Different from Us (and Why That’s a Good Thing) Jen Wilkin (Crossway, April) Wilkin highlights the joy of seeing our limited selves in relation to a limitless God—and how realizing this frees us from striving to be more than we were created to be, which is the root of human sin and rebellion. The Church: A Theological and Historical Account Gerald Bray (Baker Academic, April) Bray discusses the four classic marks of the church—its oneness, holiness, catholicity, and apostolicity. He then surveys the ecumenical climate today and suggests ways that these marks should manifest in our present global context. A Theology in Outline Robert Jenson (Oxford, April) Jenson frames all of Christian theology as a response to the question, “Son of man, can these bones live?” (Ezek. 37:3). He considers how the story that God lives with his people continues, and whether …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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Streams of Joy: Into the Heart of Gilmore Girls Devotion

By Kate Shellnutt The creator and co-host of the Gilmore Guys podcast reflects on a year of unexpected success. Kevin Porter can’t emphasize this enough: Nobody expects their amateur podcast to become a hit. Especially not when it’s made by two relatively unknown young guys, recording in a church office. Especially not when your topic is a show that hasn’t been on TV for seven years. Especially not when you’re a pair of dudes talking about every episode of Gilmore Girls. “When we started our show, our greatest ambition was to invite people on who we wanted to talk to or work with in a comedic context,” said Porter, a longtime Gilmore fan who co-hosts with his pal Demi Adejuyigbe, who’s watching for the first time. “We thought it would be fun, maybe some Gilmore Girls fans would find it, and that was it.” And yet, Gilmore Guys reached No. 1 on the iTunes comedy charts about a year ago, with help from early coverage in The Atlantic and a bump in listeners when Serial concluded its first season. In 2015, they regularly featured famous friends from the comedy world, became picked up by the HeadGum podcast network, and built up a loyal …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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InterVarsity, #BlackLivesMatter, Criticism, and Three Suggestions for the Future

By Ed Stetzer What are we to make of the recent InterVarsity comments on #BlackLivesMatter? For more than 60 years, InterVarsity Christian Fellowship has been a leader in discussions about race and diversity among evangelicals. It began after an incident in the late 1940s, according to former InterVarsity president Alec Hill, who stepped down earlier this year, after being diagnosed with cancer. Here’s how Hill tells the story: ‘One of my favorite InterVarsity stories involves a Trustee, who in 1945 volunteered to host a Bible study in her home,” Hill wrote in 2003. “Unexpectedly, a staff member invited several Black students. When the Trustee objected and threatened to report the staff member to the entire Board, the latter responded—a la Dirty Harry— “please do.” As a result of this incident, the Board passed a resolution forbidding racial segregation at InterVarsity events and calling for unity in the body of Christ. This was a gutsy decision, a clarion call for biblical justice in an era when Jim Crow was alive and well. Today, InterVarsity has become one of the most diverse evangelical ministries in the United States. Of its more than 40,000 students, only 46% identify as White Americans. Conflict is Inevitable in Conversations about …read more Source:: Christianity Today       ...
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