Archives for Religion - Page 185

Black clergy seek to bridge ‘green’ gap

By Adelle M. Banks (RNS) Although often reluctant to get on board, African-American churches are being encouraged to be more involved in environmental issues from conservation to advocacy. The post Black clergy seek to bridge ‘green’ gap appeared first on Religion News Service. …read more Source: Religion news Service...
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Quote of the Day: Law Professor Douglas Laycock

By Yonat Shimron “The debate has been captured by utterly intolerant people on both sides. Everybody wants religious liberty for me, and my opponent ground into the dust.” –University of Virginia law professor Douglas Laycock, quoted by The Washington Post about how the current controversy over gay rights and religious freedom in several U.S. states is “creating a The post Quote of the Day: Law Professor Douglas Laycock appeared first on Religion News Service. …read more Source: Religion news Service...
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REVIEW: Well-intentioned ‘Son of God’ doesn’t go too deep

By Claudia Puig (RNS) “Son of God,” which opens Friday (Feb. 28), takes no real chances, opting for a moderately involving re-telling of an oft-told story. The post REVIEW: Well-intentioned ‘Son of God’ doesn’t go too deep appeared first on Religion News Service. …read more Source: Religion news Service...
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Religious liberty vs. civil rights: A balancing act

By Richard Wolf (RNS) While religious liberty remains a “core value” in Arizona, Gov. Jan Brewer said Wednesday, “so is non-discrimination.” And therein lies the balancing act that’s at the root of several other disputes. The post Religious liberty vs. civil rights: A balancing act appeared first on Religion News Service. …read more Source: Religion news Service...
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Good for business * Good for love * Good luck: Friday’s roundup

By Cathy Lynn Grossman Today’s top stories and blogs are all about love, change and luck — and politics, abuse and more. The post Good for business * Good for love * Good luck: Friday’s roundup appeared first on Religion News Service. …read more Source: Religion news Service...
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Religion

Islamists demand levy in gold from Christians in Syrian city they control

By Reuters Staff (Residents search under rubble at a site hit by what activists say was a Scud missile from forces loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad in Raqqa, eastern Syria November 28, 2013. REUTERS/Nour Fourat ) An al Qaeda splinter group has demanded that Christians in a Syrian city it controls pay a levy in gold and curb displays of their faith in return for protection, according to a statement posted online on Wednesday. The Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), mainly composed of foreign fighters, is widely considered the most radical of the groups fighting President Bashar al-Assad, and is also engaged in a violent struggle with rival Islamist rebels. Its directive to Christians in the eastern city of Raqqa is the latest evidence of the group’s ambition to establish a state in Syria founded on radical Islamist principles, a prospect that concerns Western and Arab backers of other rebel groups fighting Assad. ISIL said it would ensure Christians’ safety in exchange for the levy and their adherence to restrictions on their faith, citing the Islamic legal precept of ‘dhimma’. It said Christians must not make renovations to churches or other religious buildings, display religious insignia outside of churches, ring church bells or pray …read more Source: Reuters Faithword...
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Religion

Indian ministry to discuss developing Islamic endowments for large Muslim minority

By Reuters Staff (Muslims pray at the Jama Masjid (Grand Mosque) during Eid al-Fitr, in the old quarter of Delhi August 31, 2011. REUTERS/Vijay Mathur ) India’s Ministry of Minority Affairs has enlisted a Kuala Lumpur-based body to help develop Islamic endowments, or awqaf, aiming to mobilise a large pool of assets in a country that is home to one of the biggest Muslim populations in the world. The World Islamic Economic Forum Foundation, which organises conferences and workshops on Muslim business around the world, will hold a roundtable later this year to discuss ways to improve management of India’s estimated 490,000 waqf properties. Institutions such as the Jeddah-based Islamic Development Bank, Malaysia’s Hajj Pilgrim Fund and its largest state-owned fund manager Permodalan Nasional Bhd will attend the event, the WIEFF says. Awqaf exist around the world, receiving donations from Muslims to operate social projects such as mosques, schools and welfare schemes. They have amassed huge holdings of real estate, commercial enterprises, cash, equities and other assets. But in many cases the management of these assets remains primitive; money is often tied up in property or bank deposits that earn miniscule or even zero returns, imposing economic costs on local economies. India, with an estimated 177 million Muslims, has …read more Source: Reuters Faithword...
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Religion

Indian ministry to discuss developing Islamic endowments for large Muslim minority

By Reuters Staff (Muslims pray at the Jama Masjid (Grand Mosque) during Eid al-Fitr, in the old quarter of Delhi August 31, 2011. REUTERS/Vijay Mathur ) India’s Ministry of Minority Affairs has enlisted a Kuala Lumpur-based body to help develop Islamic endowments, or awqaf, aiming to mobilise a large pool of assets in a country that is home to one of the biggest Muslim populations in the world. The World Islamic Economic Forum Foundation, which organises conferences and workshops on Muslim business around the world, will hold a roundtable later this year to discuss ways to improve management of India’s estimated 490,000 waqf properties. Institutions such as the Jeddah-based Islamic Development Bank, Malaysia’s Hajj Pilgrim Fund and its largest state-owned fund manager Permodalan Nasional Bhd will attend the event, the WIEFF says. Awqaf exist around the world, receiving donations from Muslims to operate social projects such as mosques, schools and welfare schemes. They have amassed huge holdings of real estate, commercial enterprises, cash, equities and other assets. But in many cases the management of these assets remains primitive; money is often tied up in property or bank deposits that earn miniscule or even zero returns, imposing economic costs on local economies. India, with an estimated 177 million Muslims, has …read more Source: Reuters Faithword...
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Religion

Kid gloves treatment seen softening Israeli crackdown on pro-settler vandals

By Dan Wilchins (Israeli soldiers stand near the damaged door of a mosque in the West Bank village of Orif, near Nablus November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Abed Omar Qusini ) Last March, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu launched a crackdown on crimes that elsewhere might be shrugged off as ugly but sufferable mischief – racist graffiti, slashed tires, hacked orchards and small-scale arson. Such vandalism takes on a whole different meaning when it is perpetrated by ultranationalist Jews against Palestinian property, risking renewed violence in the occupied West Bank and east Jerusalem, disrupting U.S.-mediated peace talks and further sapping Israel’s image abroad. Israeli officials, including Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon, have likened the incidents – dubbed “price tagging” in a reference to making the government “pay” for curbs on Jewish settlement of Palestinian land – to terrorism. Yet despite dozens of arrests, there have been few convictions, and the vandalism continues to occur almost weekly. Churches, peace activists and even the Israeli army have also been targets. (A monk stands next to graffiti sprayed on a wall at the entrance to the Latrun Monastery near Jerusalem September 4, 2012.REUTERS/Baz Ratner ) “In every incident, we go for the maximum possible charges, but in the end we tend to run up …read more Source: Reuters Faithword...
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Religion

Kid gloves treatment seen softening Israeli crackdown on pro-settler vandals

By Dan Wilchins (Israeli soldiers stand near the damaged door of a mosque in the West Bank village of Orif, near Nablus November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Abed Omar Qusini ) Last March, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu launched a crackdown on crimes that elsewhere might be shrugged off as ugly but sufferable mischief – racist graffiti, slashed tires, hacked orchards and small-scale arson. Such vandalism takes on a whole different meaning when it is perpetrated by ultranationalist Jews against Palestinian property, risking renewed violence in the occupied West Bank and east Jerusalem, disrupting U.S.-mediated peace talks and further sapping Israel’s image abroad. Israeli officials, including Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon, have likened the incidents – dubbed “price tagging” in a reference to making the government “pay” for curbs on Jewish settlement of Palestinian land – to terrorism. Yet despite dozens of arrests, there have been few convictions, and the vandalism continues to occur almost weekly. Churches, peace activists and even the Israeli army have also been targets. (A monk stands next to graffiti sprayed on a wall at the entrance to the Latrun Monastery near Jerusalem September 4, 2012.REUTERS/Baz Ratner ) “In every incident, we go for the maximum possible charges, but in the end we tend to run up …read more Source: Reuters Faithword...
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Religion

Generations on, Christians fleeing Syria return to Turkish homeland they once fled

By Ayla Jean Yackley (Syriac Christians from Turkey and Syria attend a mass at the Mort Shmuni Syriac Orthodox Church in the town of Midyat, in Mardin province of southeast Turkey February 2, 2014. REUTERS/Umit Bektas) When Louis Bandak fled the violence in Syria, he sought refuge in the country his grandfather was forced to abandon exactly 90 years ago this week. Bandak, his wife and two daughters are part of a small but growing trickle of Christians arriving in Turkey after three years of civil war in Syria killed more than 140,000 people. “Although I had never been here before, it does not feel strange. This too is my homeland,” says Bandak, sitting in warm winter sun outside the 5th Century Mor Abrohom Monastery in Midyat, 30 miles north of the border. While most Christian refugees are in Lebanon or Jordan, countries with which they share linguistic or cultural ties, several thousand have come to Turkey. For many it is a reversal of their ancestors’ flight around a century ago, when World War One and the subsequent building of the post-Ottoman Turkish state made Turkey a hostile land for millions of Christians. The sectarian strife that has rent apart Syria’s delicate multi-ethnic fabric has spawned a severe humanitarian …read more Source: Reuters Faithword...
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Religion

Generations on, Christians fleeing Syria return to Turkish homeland they once fled

By Ayla Jean Yackley (Syriac Christians from Turkey and Syria attend a mass at the Mort Shmuni Syriac Orthodox Church in the town of Midyat, in Mardin province of southeast Turkey February 2, 2014. REUTERS/Umit Bektas) When Louis Bandak fled the violence in Syria, he sought refuge in the country his grandfather was forced to abandon exactly 90 years ago this week. Bandak, his wife and two daughters are part of a small but growing trickle of Christians arriving in Turkey after three years of civil war in Syria killed more than 140,000 people. “Although I had never been here before, it does not feel strange. This too is my homeland,” says Bandak, sitting in warm winter sun outside the 5th Century Mor Abrohom Monastery in Midyat, 30 miles north of the border. While most Christian refugees are in Lebanon or Jordan, countries with which they share linguistic or cultural ties, several thousand have come to Turkey. For many it is a reversal of their ancestors’ flight around a century ago, when World War One and the subsequent building of the post-Ottoman Turkish state made Turkey a hostile land for millions of Christians. The sectarian strife that has rent apart Syria’s delicate multi-ethnic fabric has spawned a severe humanitarian …read more Source: Reuters Faithword...
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Religion

Pakistani Taliban see no peace unless Islamabad government enforces sharia law

By Reuters Staff (The Pakistani Taliban negotiating team at peace talks with the government that soon broke down, at a news conference in Islamabad February 4, 2014. REUTERS/Mian Khursheed ) The Pakistani Taliban has told the Islamabad government there was no chance of peace in the country unless Pakistan changed its political and legal system and officially embraced Islamic law. The government of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif wants to find a negotiated settlement to years of fighting with the militants but talks broke down this month after a string of attacks. In a rare face-to-face meeting with journalists last week in an undisclosed location in Waziristan, a lawless region on the Afghan border, main Taliban spokesman Shahidullah Shahid said there was still hope negotiations might resume. “Despite recent bombings in North Waziristan and killing of our 74 men by the security forces during the peace talks, we are still serious about the talks,” he said, wearing an AK-47 bandolier across his chest. “If talks are to be held it would be only under sharia (Islamic law). We have made this clear to the government committee. We are fighting for the enforcement of sharia and we are holding talks for the same purpose.” Read the full story by …read more Source: Reuters Faithword...
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Religion

Pakistani Taliban see no peace unless Islamabad government enforces sharia law

By Reuters Staff (The Pakistani Taliban negotiating team at peace talks with the government that soon broke down, at a news conference in Islamabad February 4, 2014. REUTERS/Mian Khursheed ) The Pakistani Taliban has told the Islamabad government there was no chance of peace in the country unless Pakistan changed its political and legal system and officially embraced Islamic law. The government of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif wants to find a negotiated settlement to years of fighting with the militants but talks broke down this month after a string of attacks. In a rare face-to-face meeting with journalists last week in an undisclosed location in Waziristan, a lawless region on the Afghan border, main Taliban spokesman Shahidullah Shahid said there was still hope negotiations might resume. “Despite recent bombings in North Waziristan and killing of our 74 men by the security forces during the peace talks, we are still serious about the talks,” he said, wearing an AK-47 bandolier across his chest. “If talks are to be held it would be only under sharia (Islamic law). We have made this clear to the government committee. We are fighting for the enforcement of sharia and we are holding talks for the same purpose.” Read the full story by …read more Source: Reuters Faithword...
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Conservative leader Bill Gothard on leave following abuse allegations

By Sarah Pulliam Bailey (RNS) Bill Gothard’s Institute in Basic Life Principles was once a popular gathering spot for thousands of Christian families, including the Duggar family from TLC’s “19 Kids and Counting.” The post Conservative leader Bill Gothard on leave following abuse allegations appeared first on Religion News Service. …read more Source: Religion news Service...
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Judge rejects California city’s religious war memorial

By Kimberly Winston (RNS) On Thursday (Feb. 27), a U.S. district judge ruled that a granite monument depicting a soldier kneeling in prayer before a cross lacked “a secular purpose” and has “the unconstitutional effect” of endorsing religion over nonreligion. The post Judge rejects California city’s religious war memorial appeared first on Religion News Service. …read more Source: Religion news Service...
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New documentary recounts story of heroic Muslim spy

By Omar Sacirbey (RNS) The filmmakers knew they wanted to tell a story about a Muslim who did something heroic during World War II, because so few stories are known. Noor Inayat Khan’s story was the most alluring because of her deep spirituality. The post New documentary recounts story of heroic Muslim spy appeared first on Religion News Service. …read more Source: Religion news Service...
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Pope Francis: The church needs better bishops; go find them

By David Gibson (RNS) The pope has blasted hierarchical “careerism” as “a form of cancer” and derided bishops who strut about in church finery as “peacocks.” The post Pope Francis: The church needs better bishops; go find them appeared first on Religion News Service. …read more Source: Religion news Service...
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Imprisoned in England, Islamists vow to continue their fight

By Trevor Grundy CANTERBURY, England (RNS) Two-thirds of imprisoned Islamists in England have told police and prison authorities that they will never change their violent ways. The post Imprisoned in England, Islamists vow to continue their fight appeared first on Religion News Service. …read more Source: Religion news Service...
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